Since your name may be difficult for Japanese to pronounce, you may be asked to provide a nickname, e.g., “Mak-san” for Mr. Japanese may use nicknames or first names among themselves but foreigners should refrain from doing so until they are asked!Invitations are extended either in person, by telephone or on printed invitations for formal receptions or dinners and all should be taken seriously.

Switzerland is most famous for its mountains, cheese, chocolate, cows, and watches.

Of course these things are part of everyday life: check out the mouth-watering display of chocolate bars at any grocery store.

Switzerland is a tiny country of some 7.7 million people surrounded by four far-larger neighbours: France, Germany, Italy and Austria.

Yet despite its small size, it seems everyone has an opinion about what life is like in Switzerland.

Such breaches are viewed by Finns with equanimity if committed by their own countrymen and with understanding or amusement if committed by foreigners.

Codes of behaviour are fairly relaxed, and reputations – good or bad – are built up over time as the result of personal actions rather than conforming to norms or standards.

Indeed, there are very few other culture-specific considerations that visitors need be aware of.

Finns place great value on words, which is reflected in the tendency to say little and avoid ‘unnecessary’ small talk.

Finnish customs and manners are clearly European, with only a few national variations, and attitudes are liberal.